Mysterious radar signs detected on the same day across five different states in the US have still not been explained amid questions of US military involvement. Separate radar "blobs" appeared on radar detectors across Illnois, Kentucky, Indiana, Florida and Maine on 12th December. At the time, American weather stations were left puzzled by the strange radar blobs, which indicated a "severe storm" despite clear and calm weather.

The official response from the US military attempted to clear up the blobs over Kentucky, Indiana and Illnois.

Military pilots told local weather service stations that this was a result of a routine exercise.

They blamed the blobs on military jets releasing a radar-jamming material – known as chaff – during an exercise.

However, there has not been any explanation for the strange appearances in Portland, Maine or over the Florida Keys.

Adding to the concern, Maine’s Air National Guard has confirmed that there are no planes in the region equipped to release chaff.

YouTube conspiracist Tyler Glockner, who uploaded footage of the radar blip to his channel secureteam10, told viewers: "Let’s say all of these incidents were caused by chaff. It begs the question what kind of nationwide exercise were the military performing?"

"What were they trying to hide? Something is being hidden here. All the answers are not being released.

"What mass nationwide exercise were they conducting?

“It is either a mass UFO event or planes releasing radar material to cover up something in sky.”

Mutual UFO Network echoed this, telling the Courier & Press: “We believe there is more to the story than what the FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) and military and publications are telling us.”

Conspiracy theorists have detailed explanations ranging from mass UFO appearances, top-secret military tests or weather manipulation.

Viewers noted that chaff "is released to throw off a small missile, not cover an entire state".

According to experts, the plume on the radar was "unusually persistent and lasted for more than 10 hours".

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